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4 Electric Vehicles Stocks You Can Buy and Hold for the Next Decade

Given the tone and veracity of media coverage of electric vehicles over the past couple of years, it would be easy to believe nobody had thought of EVs before and that Elon Musk had conjured the electric car from his backside to save the world. The truth is that some of the first cars were powered by batteries, and EVs first became popular around the turn of the 20th century, but it was the electric starter motor that effectively killed the electric car for mass consumers along with the cheap cost of Ford’s Model T. However, automakers have constantly been looking at the viability of contemporary technology for cars charging from the electric grid as a replacement for gasoline power. These are just some that history shouldn’t forget.

1941 Peugeot VLV

The Peugeot VLV was canceled by the Nazis, which is about the biggest compliment you could give a vehicle. The little electric car came about from practicality as the German occupation of France involved automakers having to turn their plants over to the conquerors, and gasoline being sold to citizens was outlawed. The French did not take any of this laying down, though. People got creative in converting their cars to run on things like acetylene or compressed gases captured from burning combustible materials. In secret, some companies had a go at making electric cars, but the only major automaker to do so was Peugeot. The company’s engineers worked in secret to design the car, then sold it overtly.

The VLV (Voiture Légère de Ville, meaning Light City Car) had a narrower rear track than the front, so it wouldn’t need a differential, ran on four 12-volt batteries, and got a range of around 50 miles with a top speed of 22 mph. The occupying Nazi regime wasn’t impressed, and it was banned with just 377 built.

Sotheby’s

Peugeot

Peugeot

1947 Tama Electric Car

Nissan has Tama Electric Car number 0009 in its heritage collection, and it’s as cute as a start button. It’s relevant here because before Nissan became Nissan, Tama was a brand name under the Tokyo Electro Automobile Company, which became Prince Motors, Ltd, which merged with Nissan. In 1947, Japan was crippled following World War II and had a shortage of oil, food, and goods in general. However, because there were few home appliances or bulk electricity users, electrical power was abundant. That led to an abundance of electric car start-up companies, and they were popular until petrol became viable as fuel again. The little 4.5-hp Tama Electric Car was a four-seater often used up until 1951 as a taxi. There was also a truck version available. Impressively, it weighed as little as a Mazda MX-5 Miata and had a range of 40 miles but was known to manage up to 60. The downside was a lead-acid battery and a top speed of only 22 mph (17 if you wanted maximum range).

Nissan

Source :https://www.fool.com/investing/2022/02/26/4-electric-vehicles-stocks-you-can-buy-and-hold-fo/

8 Cool Electric Cars You’ve Never Heard Of

Given the tone and veracity of media coverage of electric vehicles over the past couple of years, it would be easy to believe nobody had thought of EVs before and that Elon Musk had conjured the electric car from his backside to save the world. The truth is that some of the first cars were powered by batteries, and EVs first became popular around the turn of the 20th century, but it was the electric starter motor that effectively killed the electric car for mass consumers along with the cheap cost of Ford’s Model T. However, automakers have constantly been looking at the viability of contemporary technology for cars charging from the electric grid as a replacement for gasoline power. These are just some that history shouldn’t forget.

1941 Peugeot VLV

The Peugeot VLV was canceled by the Nazis, which is about the biggest compliment you could give a vehicle. The little electric car came about from practicality as the German occupation of France involved automakers having to turn their plants over to the conquerors, and gasoline being sold to citizens was outlawed. The French did not take any of this laying down, though. People got creative in converting their cars to run on things like acetylene or compressed gases captured from burning combustible materials. In secret, some companies had a go at making electric cars, but the only major automaker to do so was Peugeot. The company’s engineers worked in secret to design the car, then sold it overtly.

The VLV (Voiture Légère de Ville, meaning Light City Car) had a narrower rear track than the front, so it wouldn’t need a differential, ran on four 12-volt batteries, and got a range of around 50 miles with a top speed of 22 mph. The occupying Nazi regime wasn’t impressed, and it was banned with just 377 built.

Sotheby’s

Peugeot

Peugeot

1947 Tama Electric Car

Nissan has Tama Electric Car number 0009 in its heritage collection, and it’s as cute as a start button. It’s relevant here because before Nissan became Nissan, Tama was a brand name under the Tokyo Electro Automobile Company, which became Prince Motors, Ltd, which merged with Nissan. In 1947, Japan was crippled following World War II and had a shortage of oil, food, and goods in general. However, because there were few home appliances or bulk electricity users, electrical power was abundant. That led to an abundance of electric car start-up companies, and they were popular until petrol became viable as fuel again. The little 4.5-hp Tama Electric Car was a four-seater often used up until 1951 as a taxi. There was also a truck version available. Impressively, it weighed as little as a Mazda MX-5 Miata and had a range of 40 miles but was known to manage up to 60. The downside was a lead-acid battery and a top speed of only 22 mph (17 if you wanted maximum range).

Nissan

Nissan

1966 Chevrolet Electrovair II

GM was looking hard at EVs in the 1960s, and the lightweight rear-engined Corsair was ripe for conversion. The sequel to the first Electrovair concept put the electric motor in the back and was powered by a 532-volt silver-oxide battery array from the front of the car and mounted above the rear motor. The Electrovair II had a range of 40-80 miles and similar performance figures to the gas-powered car. Unfortunately, the silver-oxide battery array was power-dense, but it degraded quickly, and the lifetime for the batteries was around 100 charges.

General Motors

General Motors

Source : https://carbuzz.com/features/evs-from-mainstream-automakers-before-they-were-cool

Uber Taking Steps To Get Its Drivers Into Electric Cars

Tesla Model Y wins Cars.com’s Best Electric Vehicle of 2022 award

The Tesla Model Y has captured Cars.com’s “Best Electric Vehicle of 2022” award, beating out several worthy competitors to be named the best EV of the year.

The Model Y is Tesla’s newest addition to its purchasable fleet of vehicles, and the first all-electric crossover to come out of the Fremont factory in Northern California. Tesla developed the Model Y to be a mass-market vehicle capable of handling a variety of tasks. Not only is the vehicle lightning fast in typical Tesla fashion, but it also packs enough cargo space to give full-sized SUVs something to sweat about. It is truly Tesla’s most well-rounded vehicle, suitable for nearly any lifestyle and at a price point that won’t break the bank.

“Tesla is an electric car innovator, and the Model Y reflects that leadership with its efficiency, charging capability, range, and options,” Cars.com’s synopsis of the Model Y said. “It checks a lot of boxes for consumers who have been considering making the jump to an EV.”

EVs are still a small slice of the overall passenger vehicle market in the United States. While EV adoption is continuing to grow at a fast rate, Cars.com says that about a third of active car shoppers are considering an electric vehicle. Additionally, the site stated that occurrences of searching for an EV on Cars.com have doubled in the past year, while inventory levels of EVs have dropped 30 percent since 2021, showing there is plenty of interest from consumers.

The Model Y may be one of the most appealing options for those who are considering switching to an EV from a gas car. Cars.com notes the Model Y’s incredible efficiency, which is paired with 326 miles of EPA-rated range in the Long Range All-Wheel Drive variant. Not only will the Model Y get you to where you need to go in a minimal number of charging stops, but it also gets better with age. The vehicle, like the rest of Tesla’s fleet, receives Over-the-Air software updates to upgrade vehicle capabilities, fix bugs, or increase performance.

The Model Y is also great for those who have a focus on purchasing cars with a focus on American manufacturing. The vehicle was ranked third on the 2021 American-Made Index, trailing its sibling in the Tesla Model 3 and Ford Mustang.

Cars.com’s list is void of the Lucid Air, Rivian R1T, Hyundai Ioniq 5, and Kia EV6. The publication noted demand and production growth of electric vehicles will allow more models to be considered for the award in the future.

Source : https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-model-y-cars-best-electric-vehicle-2022/

US EV Sales Hit All-Time High In Q4 2021: Tesla Leads w/72% Share

Source : https://insideevs.com/news/569711/tesla-leads-ev-sales-surge/

US EV Sales Hit All-Time High In Q4 2021: Tesla Leads w/72% Share

It wasn’t that long ago when many people were talking about the fact that US EV sales only made up 1 to 2 percent of the total automotive market share. However, according to the latest report from Kelley Blue Book (KBB), electric vehicle sales peaked in Q4 2021, making up an impressive ~4.5 percent of all car sales from October through December of last year.

As you know, the aftermath of the COVID-10 pandemic, along with a global chip shortage and related supply chain issues have put a big dent in automakers’ production and deliveries. Given the dire situation, it may come as a surprise that EV makers were able to find so much success.

That said, a closer look reveals that the spike in US EV market share can be attributed to a few situations. First of all, gaining market share is easier when your competition is down. Shoppers on our shores bought 21.3% fewer cars in Q4 2021 year-over-year, though they bought 72% more electric cars.

Second, legacy automakers are producing compelling EVs and focusing on their production and sale. KBB says it found some 25 all-electric models that benefitted from sales in the US for the final quarter of the year.

However, arguably most important, of the ~148,000 EVs sold in the States in Q4 2021, Tesla delivered a whopping 72% of them. We’ve already published several reports about how Tesla is successfully navigating the chip shortage, and we even heard that the Biden Administration would welcome his guidance related to how other automakers can follow suit.

KBB says the Tesla Model Y was the leader of the pack in the US in Q4 2021, with a total of 63,386 deliveries. While the number doesn’t quite account for half of all US EV sales during the quarter, it’s knocking on the door.

Kelley Blue Book also reminds us that General Motors delivered 1 GMC Hummer EV in Q4 2021. Meanwhile, electric vehicle startup Rivian delivered 575 R1T electric pickup trucks during the same three-month period. KBB anticipates higher EV sales numbers for Q1 2022.

How many electric cars do you think will be delivered in the US in Q1 2022? Where will US EV market share be by the end of 2022? Leave us your thoughts and details in the comment section below.

Source : https://insideevs.com/news/569711/tesla-leads-ev-sales-surge/

Electric Cars Compared By Price Per Mile Of EPA Range: Feb 9, 2022

In addition to the general price comparison of all-electric cars in the U.S., let’s take a look at another metric – price per mile of range.

There is no change in the first few places since we last checked in September 2021, but there are new models that are surprisingly high in the ranks.

In this post, we compare the base prices (MSRP plus obligatory destination charge) and EPA Combined range – the only common metrics that we have for the U.S. BEV market.

For reference, we include also the price per mile after applying the federal tax credit of $7,500 (if eligible).

First of all, the Chevrolet Bolt EV remains the leader of the price per mile of EPA range rank (at $124/mile) and, at the same time, is basically not available (out of production) due to the massive battery recall (which concerns also the Bolt EUV).

The second highest Hyundai Kona Electric ($138/mile) is the top one when including the federal tax credit (at $107/mile). However, this model is not widely available nationwide.

It means that if we would like to focus on models available more widely/nationwide, actually the Tesla Model 3 Long Range AWD would be the number one at $146/mile (no federal tax credit eligible though), while the Nissan LEAF e+ S would be number one at $107/mile after including the federal tax credit.

The least expensive BEV per mile of EPA Combined range:

  • Limited availability:
    MSRP+DST: Chevrolet Bolt EV at $124/mile
    MSRP+DST (incl. federal tax credit): Hyundai Kona Electric at $107/mile
  • Nationwide or wide availability:
    MSRP+DST: Tesla Model 3 Long Range AWD at $146/mile
    MSRP+DST (incl. federal tax credit): Nissan LEAF e+ S at $114/mile

An interesting thing is that the all-new Hyundai Ioniq 5 SE RWD (77.4 kWh) is not far behind Tesla and Nissan, at $148/mile ($123/mile including federal tax credit). It’s not a bad result for what the car offers.

Its cousin, the Kia EV6 Wind RWD (77.4 kWh), is not far behind at $156/mile ($131/mile incl. federal tax credit).

The Nissan Ariya is expected to be right behind the Kia EV6 (its range is not yet official, rather just expected by the manufacturer).

The upcoming Ford F-150 Lightning, in its entry-level Pro version with Extender Range battery (available for fleet customers), is at $172/mile ($147/mile incl. federal tax credit). Not bad, as long as the expected range figures are confirmed, of course. The Pro version with Standard Range battery is at $181/mile ($149/mile incl. federal tax credit).

In the case of the XLT trim of the Ford F-150 Lightning, the price per mile surges to roughly $240/mile, which is noticeably above the Rivian R1T ($218/mile).

The worst result belongs to Porsche Taycan/Porsche Taycan Cross Turismo and Audi e-tron GT as their EPA range ratings are exceptionally low compared to most real-world tests. They are also quite expensive.

Source : https://insideevs.com/news/566438/bev-price-per-range-20220209/

Electric vehicle sales hit record high in 2021, KBB reports

Source : https://www.foxbusiness.com/personal-finance/cost-of-electric-vehicles-record-high-sales

BYD zooms past Tesla in China’s electric-car market

BYD zooms past Tesla in China’s electric-car market

Middle-of-the-road prices fuel Chinese automaker’s growth, but profit lags

A BYD Dolphin, part of the Ocean series of new energy vehicles, on display in Guangzhou. (Photo by Takashi Kawakami)

GUANGZHOU — Chinese automaker BYD sold more electric and hybrid vehicles in China last year than Tesla, new industry figures show, with a surge of growth that puts it on track to doubling sales in 2022.

One of the BYD’s most sought-after models, the Song Plus DM-i plug-in hybrid, went on sale last March. The price starts at roughly 150,000 yuan ($23,600).

“It’s so popular that buyers now have to wait three to six months get theirs,” said a sales associate at a dealership in Huizhou, a city in southern China.

The model sells so well because “the fuel economy is better by far compared with competing gasoline vehicles in the same price range,” said an analyst at Chinese brokerage Zheshang Securities.

BYD is known for its electric vehicles and hybrids, part of what China calls “new energy vehicles.” But gasoline-powered autos accounted for the majority of its sales volume until 2020.

The company took a sharp turn away from gasoline vehicles last year. Sales in that category dropped around 40% that year to 130,000 vehicles.

Meanwhile, sales of plug-in hybrids rose roughly sixfold to 270,000 vehicles. Electric vehicles more than doubled to 320,000. Overall sales shot up 70% in 2021, and BYD looks to double sales to 1.5 million this year.

Tesla’s sales in China more than tripled to about 473,000 vehicles, according to market intelligence company Marklines. BYD leads when plug-in hybrids are included.

BYD now vies for first place in the new energy vehicle category against SAIC-GM-Wuling Automobile, a joint venture that made a name for itself with the $4,500 electric car.

BYD has captured demand for moderately priced electrics and hybrids. The Song Plus DM-i is part of a series of models named after Chinese dynasties, such as the Qin and the Yuan.

Many of BYD’s electric vehicles and hybrids are priced between 100,000 yuan and 200,000 yuan — well below Tesla’s electric models that start at about 300,000 yuan.

At the other end, SAIC-GM-Wuling’s low-priced electric car is taking off in China’s rural areas.

BYD formed in 1995 as a manufacturer of rechargeable batteries and was quick to diversify. It entered the automotive industry in 2003.

Even today, BYD wins contracts to build monorails and manufacture smartphones. The company jumped into disposable masks in early 2020 when the coronavirus pandemic hit that year.

The rising demand for EVs and hybrids has changed the dynamic at the Shenzhen-headquartered company. “Priorities have completely shifted to passenger vehicles this year,” said a person with knowledge of internal discussions at BYD.

BYD aims to win over new customers by expanding its Ocean series of vehicles, which features designs targeting young people. Ocean will complement the Dynasty lineup.

Overseas expansion is gaining steam as well. Last year, BYD started exporting passenger EVs to Europe. Last week, a model went on sale in Australia.

There are also plans to increase manufacturing capacity. Assembly plants for passenger vehicles are limited to a few locations, including Shenzhen headquarters. The company is moving forward with plans to build or expand facilities in about 10 locations.

Capacity to make passenger vehicles stood at 600,000 at the end of 2020. The volume is expected to surpass 3 million vehicles in a few years, according to local media reports.

One of BYD’s biggest obstacles is falling profitability. Despite growing vehicle sales, net profit undershot the year-earlier figure during the second and third quarters last year.

High input costs are a main culprit. Vertically integrated BYD makes cars as well as the batteries, chips and other components for them, leaving it exposed to costs across the supply chain.

BYD looks to spin off parts-maker units. In late January, a semiconductor subsidiary received approval to list on Shenzhen’s startup market CHINext. After the listing, BYD will be free to shop around for other suppliers.

Another area of concern is a lack of higher-profit premium models. Only a few BYD vehicles are priced over 200,000 yuan, and virtually none are in the 300,000-yuan range, where Tesla dominates.

Meanwhile, competition from non-Chinese automakers is intensifying. Volkswagen looks to expand sales of its next-generation electric vehicles, the ID series. These cars occupy the 200,000 yuan to 300,000 yuan price range. Honda Motor will release the first in the line of e:N electric models as soon as this spring.

These Are The Best Electric Cars You Can Buy In 2022 (That Aren’t A Tesla)

It’s almost tax time, when a vast swath of the American middle class collects a healthy tax refund and starts browsing the internet for a new car, maybe even a new Tesla. And, because this is CleanTechnica and we hope that your next new car is electric, we thought we’d help by putting together a list of the best new electric cars you can buy in 2022.

Readers who are familiar with my bike lists already know that this is likely to be a highly subjective list, with a few different definitions of “best” thrown in throughout. That said, I’ll try to make any personal biases clear enough in the article, and we’ll be looking forward to hearing your thoughts on my picks — and learn more about your picks! — in the comments section at the bottom of the page.

Oh, and there’s one more twist: none of these picks will be Teslas.

What I Have Against Tesla

I can hear the questions and criticisms now, but the short, honest answer is that I have nothing against Tesla. In fact, if someone were to ask me out of the blue which electric car they should buy, the answer would almost always be whatever Tesla model is most like the other cars they’re considering. Teslas are fast, seemingly safe, technologically advanced, and relatively affordable. What’s more, the Tesla brand has built up some solid street cred. Despite a RWD (base) Tesla Model 3 carrying a $40,690 starting price tag (including potential incentives), more than one person I’ve talked to about the car have responded with a knee-jerk, “I don’t have $100,000!” That’s what the normies think these cars cost — and whether you think that goes into the “pro” or the “con” column is your business.

So, if the cars Tesla offers are safe, the shopping experience is comfortable, the cost of ownership is low, and the neighbors will be impressed, why wouldn’t you want a Tesla?

Why You Might Not Want a Tesla

When Elon Musk posted a meme that seemed to favorably compare Adolf Hitler to Canadian PM Justin Trudeau, it’s safe to say that it rubbed a lot of people the wrong way. Musk quickly deleted the tweet, but the damage to his image, and Tesla’s, seems like it was already done. The blowback online (and, frankly, the dubiously racist nature of the comments defending the meme), led me to write an article asking readers what it would finally take to get them to turn their backs on the Technoking of Tesla.

The ensuing comment thread has devolved pretty much into what you’d expect it to devolve into in a post-Trump America, but one comment stood out me as thoughtful, genuine, and relatable. It was written by a user who goes by Mike N., and echoes feelings I’ve heard from other friends as well. Mike N. writes, “I’ve wanted to get a Tesla to replace the Leaf I’ve been driving the last 8 years, but my wife doesn’t want to drive a Tesla because she thinks Elon is a douchebag. This is going to make it a lot harder for me to convince her otherwise, and I’m starting to question whether I even want to anymore. Tesla is a trailblazing company I sincerely hope succeeds, maybe just without its current leader.”

Source : https://cleantechnica.com/2022/02/22/these-are-the-best-electric-cars-you-can-buy-in-2022-that-arent-a-tesla/